Tag Archives: Protein

Protein Pancakes and Refrigerator Jam

Protein Pancakes with Chia Refrigerator Jam

Protein Pancakes with Chia Refrigerator Jam

Protein Pancakes with Chia Refrigerator Jam

I am so thankful I saw a friend post this pancake recipe on Facebook! They are delicious! With only 3 ingredients you wouldn’t expect them to be tasty and I certainly didn’t expect them to cook up just like regular pancakes. Okay, okay…they aren’t quite as fluffy as regular pancakes but I’m willing to take a flatter pancake to not crash and be starving an hour after eating the other carb and gluten laden pancakes. This is also a great recipe for those of you who say to us, “I’m so sick of eggs. What else can I eat for breakfast?”

This same person posted a refrigerator jam recipe too. And I thought it would be delicious on the protein pancakes. I was right! I couldn’t find her original post with the recipe but a quick google search for chia refrigerator jam and I had a number of recipes to choose from. I’ll show you below the combination that I came up with. It was delicious and super refreshing but in the future for pancakes I would omit the lemon. As we’re in blueberry and raspberry season now, I would use one of those if I were you!

Protein Pancakes: Protein Pancake Ingredients

1 banana

2 eggs

1 scoop protein powder

Optional:

½ tsp of cinnamon

Dash of sea salt

Instructions:

Mash banana with a fork, add the eggs and protein and mix together.

Mel t butter in a skillet on med/low heat.

Pour in batter and cook 2-3 minutes on each side.

Mashed Bananas Protein Pancake Batter Protein Pancake

Strawberry Chia Seed Jam:Jam Ingredients

1 lb strawberries, hulled and washed

1 tablespoons maple syrup

3 tablespoons chia seeds

Zest of one lemon

Quarter of a lemon wedge

Instructions:

Put the strawberries in the base of a food processor or blender and pulse until desired consistency. Transfer pureed berries to a small bowl and combine with maple syrup, chia seeds, lemon zest and juice of lemon wedge.

Transfer jam to a glass container and cool to room temperature before storing in refrigerator. Jam will thicken as it cools.

Jam will last up to two weeks in the fridge.

Lemon Zest Strawberry Strawberry Chia Jam

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Chunky Apple Muffins (grain free!)

Chunky Apple Muffins

This past weekend we had a bunch of family in town for Dr. Court’s birthday and my baby shower. I wanted to have something quick and easy for breakfast since we had 5 people (1 bathroom!) and a baby all needing to be ready by 10am. I made an egg veggie casserole ahead of time but I thought it would be nice to have muffins or something to go with it.

Dr. Court’s assistant Kate recently shared this recipe with me so I thought I’d give it a try. Wow! I am so glad I did. They were a huge hit! I can’t wait to make them again. I feel a little guilty eating them kind of like the Paleo Breakfast Bread but I don’t need to because they’re grain free. They do have a little maple syrup but I reduced it from the original recipe by half. I also added a little protein powder to them. We use Biotics Research Whey Protein as it is not flavored and can easily be added to recipes like this. In fact, I often add it to things that I bake.

Chunky Apple Muffins

Muffin Ingredients!

Makes 12 muffins

2 c. almond flour

3 T. coconut flour

1/2 t. baking soda

2 scoops Whey Protein powder

1/2 t. salt

1 t. cinnamon

1/4 c. maple syrup

1/4 c. olive oil

2 t. vanilla extract

1 organic egg

1 large organic apple, peeled, cored and diced

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a muffin tin with paper or silicone cups and set aside.

Combine almond flour, coconut flour, baking soda, protein powder, salt and cinnamon in a large bowl.

In a separate bowl, whisk together maple syrup, olive oil, vanilla and egg.

Add wet mixture to flour mixture and mix until fully moistened.

Fold in chopped apples.

Spoon the batter into muffin tin, dividing batter evenly between all 12 cups.

Place batter in muffin cups.

Bake for 25-27 minutes, until muffins are set and golden brown.  Allow muffins to cool in pan for 30 minutes before serving. (Mine didn’t need to cook as long as the recipe states so, I suggest checking them around 20-23 minutes.)

Enjoy with some cream cheese or butter!

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The Great Soy Debate

Soy is a tricky subject.  This short video above does a great job of summarizing some of the major points about why soy is not actually a health food.  It has been marketed that way for years because it is a relatively complete protein and because it is low in fat.  The fact that it is low in fat is not debatable – it is.  However, a food low in fat is not necessarily healthy based on that one quality.  The fact that it’s a relatively complete protein is debatable.  While it may have a full compliment of amino acids in it, they are not in sufficient levels that could sustain human life if that were the only food you consumed.  Like all legumes, soy beans are deficient in sulfur-containing amino acids methionine and cysteine. In addition, modern processing denatures fragile lysine.

Soy has been touted as the “healthy alternative” to meat, the “non-allergenic” dairy, the “low-cost” protein that will feed the millions, the infant formula that is “better than breastmilk,”  and the “wonder food” for the New Age.  Unfortunately, none of this is true.

Here are some quick FAQs about soy:

  • High levels of phytic acid in soy reduce assimilation of calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and zinc. Phytic acid in soy is not neutralized by ordinary preparation methods such as soaking, sprouting and long, slow cooking. High phytate diets have caused growth problems in children.
  • Trypsin inhibitors in soy interfere with protein digestion and may cause pancreatic disorders. In test animals soy containing trypsin inhibitors caused stunted growth.
  • Free glutamic acid or MSG, a potent neurotoxin, is formed during soy food processing and additional amounts are added to many soy foods.
  • Processing of soy protein results in the formation of toxic lysinoalanine and highly carcinogenic nitrosamines.
  • Average consumption of soy foods in Japan and China is just 10 grams (about 2 teaspoons) per day. Asians consume soy foods in small amounts as a condiment, and not as a replacement for animal foods. The argument that soy is good because Asian populations consume tons of it and have lower rates of cancer and heart disease doesn’t hold up under scrutiny.
  • Most soy beans grown in the US are genetically engineered to allow farmers to use large amounts of herbicides.
  • Soy foods contain high levels of aluminum which is toxic to the nervous system and the kidneys.

If you’d like more information on soy please visit the Weston A. Price Foundation website or Dr. Mercola’s website.  They have some great information with the research to back it up.

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What’s all the hype over wheat and milk allergies anyway?

Wheat.

Image via Wikipedia

Wheat and milk are staples in most Americans’ diets.  The dairy and grain industry like it that way to be certain.  But what exactly is all the hype over eliminating these potential allergens from our diets?  And is there really any research to support all of our concerns?

Well, in one word, yes.  The short explanation of why is that both wheat and dairy are extremely prevalent in our diets.  Wheat consumption in this country is quite high – about 137 pounds per year per person.  Dairy consumption is even higher with 605 pounds consumed per year per person!  The high amounts of these in our diets leads to high levels of exposure and, therefore, higher levels of allergies and sensitivities.  What exactly do these substances do to our bodies?  This is a good question and to properly answer it we will have to break down both wheat and dairy a little further.

Wheat

Saying that a person is allergic to wheat is actually a bit inaccurate.  What people are allergic or sensitive to is the protein in wheat called gluten.  Gluten is also found in rye, oats and barley to name a few.  This protein is allergenic for good reason.  In many people it is incompletely broken down in our gut and is absorbed in a format that the body cannot recognize or use.  When this happens the immune system kicks in and there’s your allergy.  Most of the time proteins are broken down into their individual amino acids.  Amino acids are the building blocks of protein.  If we take several amino acids and hook them together we get something called a peptide.  If we take several of those peptides and hook them together we get our protein.  The body must do this in reverse order if you will when it digests our foods – protein to peptides to amino acids.  If this does not occur properly your body may absorb the peptides.  The problem with this is that the body cannot recognize the peptides as useful and actually sees them as an invader.  Invaders must be destroyed and our army (the immune system) takes over and destroys these peptides but leaves us with the after effects.  A gluten allergy causes many of the traditional allergy symptoms:

  • Swelling, itching or irritation of the mouth or throat
  • Hives, itchy rash or swelling of the skin
  • Nasal congestion
  • Itchy, watery eyes
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Cramps, nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Anaphylaxis

In children, changes in behavior might also be seen.  This happens because the undigested gluten peptide is known to circulate in the blood and bind to receptors in the brain altering behavior.  It is a complex cascade of events but many parents have noticed significant improvements at school and at home after eliminating gluten from their child’s diet.

Gluten is also the offender in people who have celiac disease.  Celiac disease and gluten allergy or sensitivity are two separate entities.  Celiac disease is a chronic digestive condition is triggered by eating gluten.  Abdominal pain, cramping, diarrhea and maldigestion are the signs and symptoms.  While celiac disease involves an immune system response, it’s a more complex food reaction than a food allergy.

Dairy

Dairy allergies can be just as problematic.  They often cause the same signs and symptoms as a gluten allergy.  The main problem comes from the protein in milk called casein.  Casein has the same issues with under digestion as gluten.  When the break down is incomplete, allergies result.  New research seems to point to the type of casein that is present in most Americans’ diets.  There are many types of casein and the difference is only the order in which the amino acids are arranged.  That order, however, seems to be critical for developing allergies.  Most milk consumed in this country is called A1 milk.  A1 stands for the type of casein in the milk.  This is the most prevalent type of casein in our milk supply.  This is the case because almost all of our cows in this country are of European decent and genetically they produce the A1 casein.  Cows of African or Asian decent produce a different kind of casein called A2.  This type of casein has not been linked to allergies as has the A1 variety.  If you or your child are allergic to milk, options are available.  Goat’s milk is a great option.  It contains casein but it contains the A2 version.  It is a great option for people suffering with milk allergies.

I must touch on lactose intolerance for a moment.  Lactose is the sugar present in milk.  Being lactose intolerant is not a milk allergy.  Lactose intolerance stems from an enzymatic deficiency.  The lactase enzyme is not present to break down the sugar in the milk.  The immune system is not involved and therefore it is not an allergy.  The symptoms include gas, bloating and diarrhea.

In my practice I often see people who have undiagnosed allergies.  They can cause many disturbing symptoms and by eliminating the offending foods people often feel much better.  If you suspect a milk or a wheat allergy the gold standard for testing is an elimination diet.  In this you completely eliminate anything from the diet that might contain wheat or milk, for instance.  I have people avoid it for 3 weeks and then reintroduce the offending foods in full force to see if there’s a change.  You must add them back in at a high level so there can be no mistake as to whether it affects you.  Also, be sure to eliminate either wheat or dairy, not both at the same time.  That way you’ll be sure you’ve found the right (or wrong!) food for you.  Blood tests that test whether your immune system has reacted to wheat and dairy are also available and stool tests work as well.

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